CHS: Lots of bike thefts on Capitol Hill

Capitol Hill Seattle reports today on a couple bike thefts on the Hill, including one $10,000 haul from a Belmont Ave apartment.

A craigslist post lays out the damage:

The following bikes were stolen from my condo today:

1) A 2011 Gunnar Sport (Blue / White) with aluminum fenders

– Serial #J11021
– Ultegra 6700 group
– Mavic Open Pro rims with a Power Tap Elite
– Deda superzero carbon seatpost
– Deda Zero100 stem and bars (white)
– Selle Italia Flite Saddle (team edition, white)

2) A Velo Vie Vitesse 300SE (White)
– Serial number CA091200292
– Ksyirium SL Wheels
– SRAM Force group
– White bar tape, white Selle Italia Saddle
– FSA stem and handlebars

3) A Redline Conquest Team (Red / Black)

– Ultegra 6600 group
– Open Pro wheelset (silver)
– FSA Gossamer cyclocross crankset
– new shimano cyclocross canti brakes

4) A 2010 Giant Anthem X2 29’er

– Completely stock, but tires are set up with Stan’s tubeless

If you have any information related to the theft of these bikes, I will give you a cash reward. Call 206-619-0455

Thanks.

In addition, Naomi from Bike Works had her rad Surly Crisscross with recognizable bar tape and front rack stolen from Seattle Central Community College Tuesday. Bike Works has sounded the alert and posted this photo:

UPDATE: Naomi’s bike has been found!

You can get a one-week snapshot of bike thefts in the city at our live-updated (and under construction) bike theft map.

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12 Responses to CHS: Lots of bike thefts on Capitol Hill

  1. Smitty says:

    A good reminder to be sure and have serial numbers written down.

    Hope at least some of these are re-united with their rightful owners.

  2. Melinda says:

    Heartbreaking. My friend’s bike got stolen this week, in Portland, too. Watch Craigslist for these, everybody!

  3. Pedals Don't Peddle says:

    Awful :( My heart goes out to these people.

    Someone I know had his $1,300 bike stolen from UW campus this summer. He filed a police report with SPD (who directed him to UWPD since the theft occurred on campus), with a serial number and everything. The thief tried to sell it to a pawnshop in Shoreline about a week after the theft and police were alerted that it was possible match being pawned, and the bike was recovered. I was amazed that it worked out like that, great job UWPD. I do wonder if SPD would have handled it as nicely.

    It looked like the thief avoid Craigslist since the bike would have been easy to spot there by anyone with patience, and chose a pawnshop outside Seattle perhaps hoping that police wouldn’t catch on to it. In case of someone stealing expensive bikes like this, I would definitely start hitting up pawn shops in and outside the city (along with informing the police and Craigslist hunts as well, of course). Friends help in situations like this.

  4. Shane Phillips says:

    I definitely second the recommendation to keep an eye on Craigslist and ideally to know something specific about your bike that can help you identify it. A (admittedly pretty reckless) friend of mine saw someone selling his wheels on Craigslist and made an appointment to meet with the guy at one of the transit tunnel stops. At first he wasn’t going to, but he eventually ended up agreeing to call the cops and one of them came along. The guy who was selling it was clearly very shady and his story about where the part came from didn’t add up, and the cop basically made him give it back. In the end my friend actually got back his entire bike.

  5. Gabriel Grant says:

    I had a bike stolen this summer and eventually got it back through Stolen Bike Registry.

    http://www.stolenbicycleregistry.com/

    It’s 100% free and 110% useful.

  6. Maryanna Brown says:

    Somebody swiped my Campagnolo Centaur 10 Speed Shifters right off my poor purple Rodriguez bike that was parked at Seattle Central this afternoon! I came out to find cut bar tape and my shifters missing. Sigh.

  7. Bryan Hance says:

    Hello – Bryan with Stolenbicycleregistry.com here. I just wanted to pop in and share a link that I found lately that underscores what a mess Craigslist has become re: enabling black market sales of stolen bikes (among other things).

    CL upper management needs to feel a lot more heat on this as local PDs have to step in and deal with this enormous theft/resale problem that CL enables. This particular video highlights what the Portland OR PD have been doing…

    http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/portland-police-conduct-craigslist-stings-stolen-goods/story?id=14817160

    and ps naomi mad congrats on the recovery :)

  8. Pingback: Bike News Roundup: The heartbreaking loss of a stolen bike | Seattle Bike Blog

  9. Benjamin says:

    two words. RENTER’S INSURANCE. i am a nurse by trade so i am not tooting my own horn here. if you are renting you can get renters insurance really cheap. then, instead of just putting out flyers with “$500 Reward” on them, you can pay the $500 deductable, at least get something back, and then move on with you life. oh, btw, if you are in a long term relationship, have a mortgage payment, or kids, go ahead and get some “term” life insurance too. :-)

  10. Doug Bostrom says:

    A little late to the party here.

    Quite apart from revenue-oriented discussions (aka useless arguments) about bicycle licensing, why not introduce a titling system for bicycles similar to that for automobiles? As it stands, perps can boost machines worth far more than many “daily drivers” and then casually launder the stolen goods through a pawn shop or Craig’s List, with no paperwork burden whatsoever, no requirement for demonstrating a legitimate owner’s right to sell. Titling would likely reduce this problem enormously, probably even more effectively than it does for motor vehicles given the relatively scarce demand for bicycle parts as opposed to frequently bent parts of automobiles needing replacement.

  11. Doug Bostrom says:

    I might add, titling bicycles would also help them make the societal transition from being wrongly regarded as a purely recreational accessory to being acknowledged as a tool for living, important property that should not be dismissed lightly when stolen.

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