City plans 11 miles of neighborhood greenways in 2012

Seattle Greenways planned for 2012 press releasegraph

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2 Responses to Seattle Greenways planned for 2012 press releasegraph

  1. Valerie La Breche says:

    It’s probably better to have no bikeway than one that puts cyclists in so much danger as the one on Ravenna Blvd. between 15th Ave. NE and Green Lake. The bike lane, especially on the side going toward Green Lake, is completely ignored by automobile drivers….with good reason, as the bicycle lane is as wide as the car lane and the signs have almost completely been worn away. The potholes are wide and deep enough to throw a cyclist to the ground. The intersection at 65th is extremely dangerous, the narrow space for cyclists squeezed between two car lanes, all three taking off at once and left turn drivers unable to see the cyclists.

    The greenway in the middle of the boulevard has ample space between the trees and would make an excellent two-lane bikeway, leaving two-way road lanes for cars on each side. A separate signal could also by installed for bike traffic.

    I would also like to suggest that prominent signs be put up around Green Lake to make pedestrians aware of the fact that they should be facing the bike traffic. Unfortunately, the pedestrian lane has people passing on the left when walking, instead of on the right, as is customary, and most people walk with their backs to the bike traffic, often stepping out into the bike lane with no warning, causing unnecessary collisions and injuries.

    • Tom Fucoloro says:

      Good news on the Ravenna Blvd problem: They’re fixing it this summer! http://seattlebikeblog.com/2012/02/03/at-long-last-city-will-repave-bumpy-ravenna-blvd-this-springsummer/

      As for the Green Lake trail issue, I don’t know what the solution is. When it’s not crowded, biking on the path works just fine. But there are plenty of times (esp on nice days) when there are so many people biking and walking (and roller blading and skateboarding, etc) that it is a problem.

      People biking are required to yield to people walking at all times. I typically choose to either ride in the street on Green Lake Dr, walk my bike or ride really slowly (which ends up being about a jogger’s pace). Mostly I just walk. The trail isn’t a particularly useful transportation corridor, so it’s not like I’m in a hurry when I’m on it.

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