No Cars Allowed

A new restaurant in Madison, Wisconsin is hoping to open up shop along a bike and pedestrian path in “the one place where you can’t hear any cars in the middle of the city,” according to the Wisconsin State Journal. In fact, it will be impossible to get there by car.

Described as “a hobbit hole meets the American Players Theatre meets a 1950s National Park recreational area,” the “Badger Den” would be a “bike-in” bar and grill open from April through October.

And to capture the zeitgeist of the Wisconsin north woods, beer and wine would also be on the menu.

“I want everything to have the logic of tap beer,” Berge said. “Bring in a bulk product that’s made locally and entire contents are taken away in a person’s stomach.”

This reminds me of when Gilligan’s Brewing was in the ActivSpace in Fremont near Hale’s Ales just feet off the Burke-Gilman. Technically, you could drive to Gilligan’s. But almost everyone there (and there were typically many people there) came by bike. Also, the beer was incredible. Sadly, Gilligan’s is currently in a state of limbo and not selling beer.

I am interested in the potential for trail-side “development.” Some businesses, like Counterbalance Bicycles, have trail-side store fronts and entrances (makes sense for a bike shop).

Counterbalance has a trail-side storefront. (via Street View)

But so often, “business” tries to assert that increased bike infrastructure is somehow bad for business. However, as the city’s population density increases, a bike and pedestrian only business would help increase business density to match it. After all, it has no need for parking.

However, I am definitely not saying we should tear down all the trees and build restaurants in the greenbelt lining the Burke-Gilman. But there may be more spaces where this could happen.

Are there any other good examples of businesses integrating with a bike trail?

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