King County working on Burke-Gilman north of Seattle, expect delays – UPDATED

Crews work on remaking the Burke-Gilman Trail in 2011. Image from King County Parks

Crews work on remaking the Burke-Gilman Trail in 2011. Image from King County Parks

King County is “ditching” along the Burke-Gilman Trail just north of the Seattle border, so leave time for delays of up to 15 minutes for the next week and a half.

This information comes from an alert we just received from King County Parks. I have asked some follow-up questions (What is “ditching?” Why is it necessary? How long is the work area?) and will update when I hear back. Here’s the text of the trail alert:

Crews will be ditching along the Gilman Trail from the 10th through the 21st, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. They have begun at the City of Seattle line (near Lake Forest Park) and will proceed east from there down the trail. There will be heavy equipment involved, so portions of the trail may be closed for up to 15 minute intervals. Thank you for your patience.

UPDATE: Just heard back from Doug Williams at King County Parks:

Ditching involves cleaning debris and clearing out the existing ditches along the trail. Stuff is growing in them, branches often fall down into them, garbage gets tossed, sediment and other material can accumulate, and the next thing you know, you’ve lost much of their ability to collect and transport water.

So we’re in there scooping out all of that junk to ensure the ditches function properly when (if?) it rains.

This entry was posted in news and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to King County working on Burke-Gilman north of Seattle, expect delays – UPDATED

  1. Chad says:

    Hopefully not during the RSVP ride this weekend.

  2. Al Dimond says:

    Darn — I was hoping “ditching” involved turning all those stop signs to face the right direction…

  3. Southeasterner says:

    Wow trail maintenance.

    If only King County could take over all of Seattle’s bike infrastructure. Riding the new Lake Sammamish trail I couldn’t help but have bike trail envy.

    Maybe at a minimum King County could hold a workshop(s) and educate their peers at Seattle DOT and the Port of Seattle on trail maintenance and trail markings (looking at you Port and your 5 mph signs!).

  4. Harrison Davignon says:

    Well good, for once a bike trail is not closed for maintenance. Maybe finally there is a wake up call that people use the trial for transportation as well as recreation. While they’re at it,, would they turn all the stop signs to face the road, were supposed to have the right away right? And make the speed limit for bicycles 15 mph, slow enough to be safe, fast enough to move right along, and enforce reckless riding rules, instead of reducing the speed limit to 5 mph!!!!!, I mine as well walk with that speed limit.

    • Josh says:

      Unfortunately, the stop signs that defy MUTCD warrants were mandated to go in that way due to the long legal struggle over rebuilding the trail.

      The hearing examiner’s opinion in the matter directly contradicted the State Supreme Court, but I suspect King County decided the hazards mandated were minimal compared to the cost, delay, and uncertainty of appealing.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *