Person killed while biking in SoDo was 1 of 21 King County residents who died in January while presumed homeless

S Holgate Street at 3rd Ave S has a single stop sign facing 3rd Ave but no traffic control for users on Holgate. (Google maps)

Four days into 2022, someone riding a bike in SoDo, at the intersection of S Holgate Street and 3rd Ave S, was struck by someone driving a Hyundai Accent. Receiving substantial injuries in the crash, including a badly injured leg. The cyclist, Antonio Tiongco, was recorded as having his address registered at a social service agency in Belltown, and was presumed by the King County Medical Examiner’s office to be homeless.

Tiongco’s death was not noted by any major news outlets in Seattle, being one of at least twenty-one people presumed homeless who died in King County in just that month alone. So far in 2022, that number has reached 64, according to the medical examiner’s online dashboard. 188 people presumed homeless died in 2021, an increase from 167 in 2019. “Accident” is the leading cause of death, making up 62% of 2021 deaths and 72% of 2022 deaths.

The recently obtained police report details how the crash occurred, on a rainy January evening just before 5pm, nearly a half hour after sunset. The driver of the Hyundai was in the left lane of westbound Holgate heading toward the railroad tracks that cross Holgate just west of 3rd. Tiongco was attempting to cross Holgate at the same time. Traffic on 3rd has a stop sign, but there is no stop sign on Holgate at the intersection. Since October 1, 2020 people riding bikes can treat stop signs as yield signs in Washington State; there is no way to know whether Tiongco didn’t see the approaching vehicle coming or misjudged the distance on a rainy night. “Based upon my review of patrols investigation and interview of [the] driver…the proximate cause of this collision was Tiongco’s failure to obey the traffic control device (stop sign) and the grant the right of way to the 2014 Hyundai Accent,” the final report on the collision investigation states. Tiongco survived for ten days, passing away from his injuries on January 14th, 2022.

A diagram showing a cyclist hit by a driver in the middle of 3rd and Holgate

This diagram from the traffic collision investigation details how police reconstructed the crash. (Source: Seattle Police Department)

SODO is one of the most dangerous neighborhoods in Seattle for people to walk or bike in. In 2017, Celso Diaz was killed at 1st Ave S and S Andover Street where he worked. Diaz had been formerly homeless but had secured a place of his own to live when he was struck and killed by someone going twice the speed limit, who fled the scene.

Almost exactly two years before the 2022 incident, on January 7, 2020, Douglas Mayhew was walking across Holgate at 8th Ave S, where there is no marked crosswalk, when he was struck by the driver of a vehicle. He later died of his injuries. On October 2nd of that year, another pedestrian was struck and killed at 1st and Holgate. SoDo’s wide streets and unforgiving intersections are not designed with the safety of people outside vehicles in mind.

Our condolences go out to the family members and friends of Antonio Tiongco.

About Ryan Packer

Ryan Packer is Temporary Editor of Seattle Bike Blog.
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5 Responses to Person killed while biking in SoDo was 1 of 21 King County residents who died in January while presumed homeless

  1. Ligaya says:

    I am Antonio Tiongco’s sister. Question; has it become accustom to assume the statements of the non investigated, against the dead victims actual cause of demise? Is this the standard protocol when someone is presumed homeless?

  2. Don Brubeck says:

    Ligaya, I am so sorry for your loss of your brother.

    Unfortunately whenever a person walking or biking is left unconscious after being struck by someone driving, they have no voice to tell the police or medics what happened. So, the police only report what the driver wanted to say. Our culture says driving is “normal” and walking and biking are not normal. This, along with any appearance of being homeless, adds prejudice into investigations, whether intended or not.

    • Ligaya says:

      God bless you Don! Today I’m asking God to not only bless you, to bless all to be guided on this journey here. Without tears this morning I truly know that during and after this life here on earth, we all indeed are never homeless. What ever here my brother was defined, he is not homeless for certain now.

  3. Jordan Van Voast says:

    Condolences for your loss and prayers to you and your family Ligaya. And I hear your voice and heart. Nobody is homeless. We all have the dignity of a home. But marginalization of people without houses, jobs, or resources needs to stop. I frequently (e-)bike down Holgate from the North Beacon Hill bike trail and then back up that way. It’s a very scary stretch of roadway for a cyclist with the big wide open pavement arena. I feel like I need about 8 eyes in my head to proceed safely, knowing that a speeding car might just run a red light, etc. Hope the City can make this area safer for pedestrians, cyclists, and community in general.

    • Ligaya says:

      Jordan, thank you ! I pray for your city to make drastic changes. Jordan I will hold you within my prayers that you always be protected on your rides God bless you

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