Park(ing) Day 2016 will span two days, applications now open

Park(ing) Day in Columbia City, 2015.

Park(ing) Day in Columbia City, 2015.

Park(ing) Day is one of my favorite days of the year. I just bike all over the city visiting dozens of new tiny parks that pop up in parking spaces for just a few hours (see our post from last year).

The day demonstrates how vibrant even a car or two worth of urban space can become when people are invited to use it. But importantly, the day makes this statement in the more fun and creative ways possible.

Park(ing) Day 2016 is September 16 and 17, but your applications are due August 5. Forms and instructions available from the city’s website.

In recent years, safe streets advocates have taken the idea to the next step by using the day as a way to demonstrate their ideas for fixing dangerous crossings or even for building protected bike lanes.

The biggest complaint about Park(ing) Day that I’ve heard year after year is that people who work days and can’t get away for a long lunch cannot participate. Typically held during work hours on a Friday, Park(ing) Day is wrapping up right when a lot of people are getting off work.

So this year, the city is trying something new: Park(ing) Day installations will be allowed to stay open Friday and Saturday. The city is also specifically encouraging safe streets demonstrations.

So you have less than a month to get your idea to the city. What ideas would you like to see demonstrated for two days? Feel free to organize in the comments below.

More details from SDOT:

SDOT is now accepting applications to turn on-street parking spaces into pop-up parks and street improvements for its PARK(ing) Day Plus+ event in September. Each year, residents, businesses and organizations participate in the international PARK(ing) Day program to engage their communities in rethinking how streets can be used.

Applications to create a PARK(ing) Day Plus+ installation are due by August 5. The short, free application can be found on SDOT’s website. It requires a site plan, location description, and documentation of neighbor notification. Completed applications or questions can be emailed to David.Burgesser@seattle.gov.

This year, SDOT is partnering with the Department of Neighborhoods to offer funding to PARK(ing) Day Plus+ participants through the Small Sparks grant program. Small Sparks grants (up to $1,000) can be used for projects and events that help build stronger and healthier communities. Grant applications must be submitted by August 5. Interested applicants can contact NMFund@seattle.gov or call (206) 233-0093.

Seattle has participated in PARK(ing) Day since 2007, and based on its success, SDOT is expanding the event into PARK(ing) Day Plus+ this year. It will now span two days: Friday, September 16 and Saturday, September 17. In addition, applicants are encouraged test out temporary street improvements, such as bike lanes and sidewalks, as well as the pop-up parks that have been the focus of the event in the past.

The original PARK(ing) Day started in 2005 by San Francisco design firm Rebar and has become an international event celebrated in over 160 cities. The event intends to raise awareness about the importance of creating a walkable, livable, and healthy city.

More information about PARK(ing) Day Plus+, including application examples and guidelines, can be found on SDOT’s website. We’ve also included a photo gallery of past PARK(ing) Day installations, so take a peek and get inspired!

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3 Responses to Park(ing) Day 2016 will span two days, applications now open

  1. Frederico Chamois says:

    I shan’t be participating this year. Last year for Park(ing) Day, we did a sweet protected bike lane on Rainier Ave S. Nobody from SDOT showed up to observe.

    Greenways gave us first prize for our project – http://goo.gl/CyuoVf – … then SDOT promptly canceled the planned construction of the Rainier Valley North-South Greenway.

    Still no safe bike route to downtown from ANY south or SE Seattle hood – not South Park, not Georgetown, not Beacon Hill, not Rainier Valley.

    Screw you, SDOT and your North-Seattle-Centric bike infrastructure.

  2. Shirley says:

    About a month ago I had some beers with like minded people who want change and one person wants the Rainier Ave PBL made again. I don’t know if I’m up to the task this year but if someone wants to figure it out I will come out for a few hours Friday to support you.

    It’s too bad about last year’s PBL on Rainier being one day. It really should have been a pop-up for a week. Yes, a WEEK! We’re a year into the road dieted area, the location of my PBL experiment, and have yet to see the the parking used other than to store the cars for the auto repair shop. Yeah, free car storage.

    I would hope that someone else takes on the task of doing something just as bold in the Rainier Valley. I’m tired of the same old same old talk talk and no action.

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