With focus on safety and access, Neighborhood Street Fund projects inch closer to construction

2014_NSF_Map2The city has released an update on the Neighborhood Street Fund projects in the pipe for completion in 2014 and 2015, and the list is full of much-needed sidewalks and improved street crossings.

Funded by the Bridging the Gap levy, the NSF projects are community-driven ideas that go through an extensive vetting process both by the city and by neighborhood councils. SDOT outlined the process in a blog post:

By December 2012, 87 applications were received from groups and individuals for a portion of the $4.5M reserved by the Bridging the Gap levy for NSF projects. These projects had to be reasonably big transportation projects located entirely on SDOT right-of-way, but could address any sort of problem. Safety was nearly always the driving force behind these proposed projects and was one of the key criteria used to determine which would be funded.

2013 is the year when the projects were planned and prioritized. By mid-February Seattle’s 13 District Councils had each selected 3 projects for further consideration. By the end of May SDOT had studied the proposal, developed a preliminary design and an initial cost estimate. The District Councils then ranked their choices (1st, 2nd and 3rd) in June and the Bridging the Gap Oversight Committee selected a dozen projects for funding from the full list by August. By October of last year the recommendations were included in the City’s budget. Nearly all of the selected projects will improve pedestrian safety.

This year, 2014, is when most of the projects are designed, and the plans and specifications are prepared. In most cases this involves coordination with other agencies or utilities and in some cases there are details to be worked out with the project sponsors or nearby stakeholders.

Below is the list of projects. SDOT has project websites for the hyperlinked ones if you want more information.

By December 2012, 87 applications were received from groups and individuals for a portion of the $4.5M reserved by the Bridging the Gap levy for NSF projects. These projects had to be reasonably big transportation projects located entirely on SDOT right-of-way, but could address any sort of problem. Safety was nearly always the driving force behind these proposed projects and was one of the key criteria used to determine which would be funded.

2013 is the year when the projects were planned and prioritized. By mid-February Seattle’s 13 District Councils had each selected 3 projects for further consideration. By the end of May SDOT had studied the proposal, developed a preliminary design and an initial cost estimate. The District Councils then ranked their choices (1st, 2nd and 3rd) in June and the Bridging the Gap Oversight Committee selected a dozen projects for funding from the full list by August. By October of last year the recommendations were included in the City’s budget. Nearly all of the selected projects will improve pedestrian safety.

This year, 2014, is when most of the projects are designed, and the plans and specifications are prepared. In most cases this involves coordination with other agencies or utilities and in some cases there are details to be worked out with the project sponsors or nearby stakeholders.

– See more at: http://sdotblog.seattle.gov/2014/07/10/neighborhood-street-fund-update/#sthash.33NV7jbB.5TWFPVcF.dpuf

Area Project Location Funding
Greater Duwamish Georgetown Festival Street 12th Avenue S between S Vale & S Bailey Streets $ 1,130,000
Northwest Greenwood Avenue N Sidewalk Greenwood Avenue N between N 92nd and N 97th streets; N 104th to N 105th streets $ 1,070,000
Magnolia / Queen Anne Lake To Bay Loop – Harrison Street Improvements

 W Harrison Street and 1st Avenue W; W Harrison Street and 2nd Avenue W $ 500,000
Greater Duwamish W Duwamish Trail Extension 8th Avenue S. from S Portland Street to S Kenyon Street $ 575,000
Southeast Rainier Beach Pedestrian Enhancements Rainier Avenue S between Seward Park Avenue S and Ithaca Place S $ 515,000
Downtown Pioneer Square Accessibility The Pioneer Square Historic District–locations on Yesler Way and sidewalk on S Jackson Street $ 407,000
East 12th Avenue Improvements 12th Avenue & E Howell Street; 12th Avenue & E Olive Street $ 385,000
Lake Union Waterway 22 Sidewalk Western side of Stone Way N, south of N 34th Street and the south side of N Northlake Way at Waterway 22 $ 290,000
Central 19th Avenue & E Union Street Improvements 19th Avenue at E Union Street; 19th Avenue at E Pike Street $ 235,000
Ballard W Woodland Elem Improvements 5-way intersection at 3rd Avenue NW, NW 56th Street, and NW 55th Place $ 150,000
Southeast Columbia City Sidewalk Ponding Repairs Rainier Avenue S between S Hudson and S Dawson streets $ 128,000
Central Dearborn & Rainier Multi-Modal Safety Rainier Avenue S and S Dearborn Street $ 115,000
Total $ 5,500,000
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2 Responses to With focus on safety and access, Neighborhood Street Fund projects inch closer to construction

  1. Zach Shaner says:

    Hooray for the 19th/union pedestrian flashers! Long overdue at a scary intersection, especially if you’re trying to cross from the north to the south side of Union. By the time you get into the eastbound lane cars are often flying over and down the hill without looking.

  2. Al Dimond says:

    There are lots of good little projects in this group. Very curious about what they’re going to achieve at Dearborn and Rainier with just a hundred-grand…

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