King County updating Burke-Gilman intersections in Kenmore + Look out for event Sunday morning

Route maps from the Biggest Loser website

Route maps from the Biggest Loser website

If you’re going to be out biking Sunday morning, expect some delays and detours on the Burke-Gilman and Ship Canal Trails. The Biggest Loser Run Walk will have 5K and half marathon events with an anticipated 2,000 participants.

Cascade Bicycle Club has the details on the trail closure schedule:

Starting at 8 a.m., the event will take participants routes that include

- the Burke-Gilman Trail from Gasworks Park to 36th Ave NW between 8 and 9:30 a.m.

- the Burke-Gilman Trail from Gasworks Park to 45th Avenue NE between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m.

- the Ship Canal Trail between 8 and 10 a.m.

The ship canal will reopen at 10 a.m., the Burke-Gilman at 1 p.m. There will be signs along the planned course announcing the trail closures.

UPDATE: There will also be some intermittent closures on the Alaskan Way Trail in Sodo Saturday morning. Details from WSDOT:

Crews building a new overpass to the west of Seattle’s stadiums will intermittently close the bicycle and pedestrian trail just north of the South Atlantic Street/East Marginal Way South intersection from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 11. Crews must close the path to keep bicyclists and pedestrians safe while a crane is moving overhead. The closures will last about five minutes each.

The crane will be moving a large sign to make room for construction of permanent trail improvements north of South Atlantic Street. The trail work will begin this fall and be completed next year.

In other trail news, King County is making changes to two Burke-Gilman Trail intersections in Kenmore starting October 22.

Details from the county:

King County Parks is making safety upgrades along the Burke-Gilman Trail at two driveway crossings in the vicinity of 91st Avenue Northeast in Kenmore.

Beginning Tuesday, Oct. 22, trail users and motorists could experience intermittent delays of up to five minutes while crews install trail alert bars, signage, striping and access control at the intersections. Flaggers will be in place to route trail users and motorists around the construction work.

The work is expected to take about one week to complete, and the project could be delayed if the weather is poor. Completing the work will bring the two intersections up to existing King County Parks regional trail standards.

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12 Responses to King County updating Burke-Gilman intersections in Kenmore + Look out for event Sunday morning

  1. Glen Buhlmann says:

    What are “trail alert bars”?

    • Tom Fucoloro says:

      I asked. I’ll update here when I hear back.

      • Tom Fucoloro says:

        Explanation from King County Parks:

        “Alert bars are in-set concrete bands that run perpendicular to the trail on each approach to the crossing. They are usually 12 feet across, 2` feet wide, and set about 30 feet back from the crossing. They provide an advance visible warning to trail users – especially for cyclists, that a crossing is coming up. They were first used in the City of Seattle on new trails, and we adopted them about five or six years ago. They first were used on the Marymoor Connector Trail through the park. We pair them with a standard bollard set and striping to create a consistent crossing configuration.”

      • Andres Salomon says:

        Soooo… they don’t serve alcohol, then? Disappointing.

      • Tom Fucoloro says:

        Bartender: “Here’s your gin and tonic, sir, oh, and by the way, have you heard about this new trail?”

  2. Bill says:

    Are these the trail crossings that are blind to the south, and effectively blind from the north because the roads descend so steeply to the trail that from below you can’t see whether a car is coming?

  3. Glen Buhlmann says:

    OK, so I clearly wasn’t the only one thinking about that type of “bar”. The fact that the story said “bars” (i.e. more than one) had me hopeful.

    • biliruben says:

      192 brewing company is right on the trail in Kenmore.

      I highly recommend it. Good beer, though you have to be very lucky to get some of their actual beer.

      Okay, this is officially OT.

  4. Mike Howell says:

    Another approach KC should consider is installing a traffic light triggered off a pavement embedded sensor to warn cyclists of approaching vehicles. Could you advise where money for this would come from?

    I commute past those driveways daily, and both are blind. I slow down, but am part of the zero (or 0.01%) bicyclists that actually stop for the stop sign at those driveways. Residents are apparently used to this bicyclist behavior and they usually stop before crossing. That said, one day a contractor came zipping up the hill and nearly took me and another cyclist out.

  5. Thatcher Hubbard says:

    I ride past those two driveways on my commute, and I’ve very nearly been run down there twice, by the same jerk in a BMW both times no less. You cans stop at the sign and still almost get hit if a driver is moving quickly. I don’t understand why the cars don’t get a STOP as well.

  6. mhoonchild says:

    I don’t understand why the driveways in Kenmore don’t have the stop signs INSTEAD of the trail. Normal traffic engineering practice is to put the stop sign on the road with less traffic. In all the years I’ve ridden on this section of trail, I’ve seen maybe two cars crossing it.

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