FamilyRide: Disaster Relief Trials registration now open – Space is limited

Seattle DRT 2013Did you feel that? Was that the mock rumble of a mock earthquake? You know it was! And with mock earthquakes, come Disaster Relief Trials. Seattle’s first DRT will occur Friday, June 21st at 3pm as part of the Bicycle Urbanism Symposium at the University of Washington.

Registration is now open!

There are 30 cargo biker spots (for cargo bikes or bikes with trailers or other means of hauling 100 pounds of emergency supplies) for $30 each, all proceeds to benefit Famillybike Seattle. There are also 30 FREE “civilian biker” spots which hit the same checkpoints, but learn valuable emergency skills rather than pick up cargo.

As you can see, space is limited so sign up now and spread the word to the cargo bikers, survivalists, and bicycle alley cat enthusiasts in your life.

About Madeleine Carlson

Madi is Seattle Bike Blog’s Staff Family Cycling Expert. She lives in Wallingford and bikes all over town with her two kids in tow. You can read more of her adventures and thoughts on family life on two wheels at FamilyRide.us
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8 Responses to FamilyRide: Disaster Relief Trials registration now open – Space is limited

  1. Andrew Squirrel says:

    What is with these events starting at 3pm on Friday?
    Does everyone assume cyclists don’t have jobs?
    Looks like my cargo bike wont be attending this.

    • Madeleine Carlson says:

      Andrew, I promise 2014 will see a weekend DRT! Our timing was tricky with working with the symposium and even more so, working around Saturday’s Fremont Solstice Parade which is starting at 3pm instead of noon for the first time in the history of solstice.

      • Jessica says:

        yes, this sounds fun but I will be at work. I would love to do the civilian version. Next time perhaps.

  2. Davey Oil says:

    “Was that the mock rumble of a mock earthquake?”
    Hah!
    I’ll be there! Representing G & O Family Cyclery, helping out by wrenching on any emergency vehicles that might need it!

  3. sb says:

    Is there more information on what’s involved with the “Civilian” group? How long is the course? (I think I saw a mention of 30 miles, but maybe that was for Portland’s version.) Since there are limited spost I guess I was just curious as to the rough expectations/requirements to ensure I can handle whatever is part of the four hours.

    • Madeleine Carlson says:

      I’ll get more info on the site very soon, but our course will be closer to 10 miles. Civilians will ride to the same checkpoints, but won’t traverse water or carry bikes over a one-meter barrier. There will be a different disaster-relief-related skill to learn and practice at each stop.

  4. Ellie says:

    Cool! After reading the Taking the Lane “Disaster” issue I’ve been a bit obsessed with bike powered emergency preparedness.

    A couple of questions:

    1. More info on the civilian class would be good?

    2. I don’t have a cargo bike, but I have a regular bike and a large trailer that is rated to carry over 100lbs, as well as a rack and panniers that can do another ~30lbs. Does that count?

    • Madeleine Carlson says:

      Hey Ellie!

      Yes, we’ll get more Civilian Class info on the site (and pasting from the comment I replied to above: Civilians will ride to the same checkpoints, but won’t traverse water or carry bikes over a one-meter barrier. There will be a different disaster-relief-related skill to learn and practice at each stop.)

      And bike+trailer is just fine for the cargo-carrying class. Portland’s event last year saw both cargo bikes and normal bikes with trailers (and a tall cargo bike because it is Portland, after all)

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