Seattle Neighborhood Greenways to host wonky discussion about Dutch bike facilities + Video!

The video above is from a presentation to the Washington Institute of Transportation Engineers earlier this month. In it, University Greenways organizer and thinker Eli Goldberg and Seattle Neighborhood Greenways leader Cathy Tuttle make a strong case for how the conversation around bicycling is changing dramatically, and why traffic engineers need to change with it.

Basically: We need to create neighborhoods and arterial streets that feel safe for everybody, and we need to find way that bicycle infrastructure can also improve neighborhoods for people who currently have no desire to pick up a bike.

If you are interested in these idea, the group is hosting an upcoming meeting looking at the design practices in the Netherlands where cycling is commonplace among huge portions of the population.

Details from the Facebook event:

With more than 25% of all trips nationwide by bicycle, the Dutch must be doing something right. Innovative design, continuous networks and high quality facilities make cycling in the Netherlands safe, convenient and efficient.

Fred Young will lead us through a visual tour of Dutch cycling infrastructure, share insights of the transportation experts he met and show how cycling is a part of daily life in the Netherlands. Steve Durrant will act as Keynote Listener during the talk.

Recently back from a 600-mile bicycle journey through northern Europe, Fred’s goal was to experience some of the best bicycle, pedestrian and public transportation facilities in the world. He rode his bike from urban centers to rural villages, transitioned from bike to public transportation, and navigated by using maps and local wayfinding systems and maps. He took 5,000 photographs along the way, some of which he will share in this interactive evening event.

Fred Young is a Landscape Architect based in Seattle. His professional interests range from public art to community gardening to sustainable transportation planning.

Steve Durrant, Principal of Alta Planning + Design, recently returned to Seattle to open Alta’s newest office. He recently visited Holland and Denmark to study and enjoy progressive active transportation infrastructure.

**WHAT: What can we do in the street like the Dutch?
**WHO: For people interested in Dutch models of safe street design
**WHEN: Monday, Feb 4th 6:30-8:30pm
**WHERE: Mosaic Community Coffee House Wallingford 4401 2nd Ave NE
**DETAILS: Bring finger food potluck. No alcohol. Local Neighborhood Greenways groups will have an opportunity to update the larger group on their news, events, and plans in 90 seconds or less at the start of the meetup.

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7 Responses to Seattle Neighborhood Greenways to host wonky discussion about Dutch bike facilities + Video!

  1. Eli says:

    Hah! I will freely characterize myself as an aggregator rather than a thinker. ;-)

    Many of the great ideas I got to share came from smart people including: David Amiton, Craig Benjamin, Max Hepp-Buchanan, Adam Parast, Josh Kavanagh, Dylan Ahearn, and the folks mentioned in the presentation.

    Also, the Dutch presentation should be great – looks like we’ll have a few folks who lived in (or are from) The Netherlands attending as well.

  2. Eli says:

    …and I forgot Mike Hendrix. ;-)

  3. Shirley says:

    At what point does the talk get wonky?

  4. RJ says:

    I love that info-graphic from Copenhagenize!! I mean, it’s depressing information, but so well portrayed!

  5. Caroline says:

    I love the cycling setup in Holland. But their land is flat, flat, flat! No matter how safe and well designed the street, how many non-bike riders will be inspired to ride up our hills? If you can master the hill, then I’m in.

  6. Craig says:

    The hills are only in your mind.

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